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VOTE WITH POWER:
VIC

A Guide to All Minor and Major parties in the 2022 Victorian Election

You can’t waste your vote in Australia.

Voting for the “better” major party first might feel like the “best” option, but you are better off voting for a minor party you love first! Keep numbering until you hit your preferred major party.
A candidate must reach 50% of the votes to win a seat, therefore if your first preference isn’t counted your second will be. This continues down your list of choices until someone reaches 50% of the votes.

Vote FOR a party you actually like

rather than picking the “better major” party.

GROUP VOTING TICKETS: Where preference deals matter

This only applies to Victorian State Elections

Victoria uses group voting for the upper house. Voters can choose one group above the line - and all you preferences are set by the parties in the group, not YOU. This is NOT like the federal election.
This means you can’t separate your favourite smaller parties from bigger parties, some parties will have different policies but will group together to get votes.


You are better off numbering under the line for the Victorian election for the Upper House sheet (the big one!). This may appear daunting - each party may have more than one candidate. The easiest way to do this is to number all candidates from your preferred party first, then go to your second preferred party until you hit a major party candidate (a Labor or Liberal candidate). This ensures your vote will eventually flow to your preferred major party!

A minor party may not win the seat, but voting for them can mean:

Gives them funding for the next election.

Shows larger parties what the people want.

They might actually WIN a seat.

Now you might be thinking that there are a lot of minor parties.
Some of their policies are difficult to find.
Luckily for you, I have compiled as few guides to help you find your new favourite political party!

WEBSITE GRADE

This is based on the following: How easy is it to find information on their policies? How hard is it to read their website? How transparent are they? Is there any deception within the website? (e.g., Using a deceptive name)

The Victorian Party Comparison Chart

This is a simplified chart to quickly compare each party’s stance on various policies. Each corresponding square is coloured depending on whether the party supports, opposes or has no policy on each topic.

SOCIAL MEDIA GRADE

A party now has a grade on how accurate their social media is to their website - not every party reflects the same views on their website and their social media accounts.

Some parties have deceptive or misleading names

which will be noted in the detailed breakdown.

Due to the “Party Integrity Bill” many minor parties have disappeared, changed names, or merged into new parties.

This is a devastating blow to Australia’s democracy. This guide will assist in showing which parties have merged or changed names so you can understand who you are voting for.

This resource is free to redistribute, share and print.

This is a simplified guide for each of the Victorian parties. For more information on each party, see the detailed party guide. The three parties that were NOT in the Federal Election are at the top for an easier comparison.

✓ = in support 

- = unclear

✖ = actively against

Blank means no mention of any policy related to the topic. 

PARTY NAME
Climate Policy
Immigration & Refugees
Women's Rights
LGBT
Medicare
NDIS
Welfare System
Drug Refom
First Nations Australians
Housing Affordability
Animal Welfare
Workers Rights
Aged Care
Website Grade
Social Media Grade
Democratic Labour Party
D-
C+
Transport Matters
B
B
Freedom Party Of Victoria
D-
F
Companion and Pets Party
-
-
D-
C
Animal Justice Party
-
-
C+
B
Aus. Greens
B+
B
Aus. Labor
-
-
B-
B
Australian Health Party
-
-
-
E
D-
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party
B+
D-
Liberal Democratic Party
-
-
-
D-
D-
Liberal Party of Aus.
-
-
-
-
-
-
D-
B
National Party of Aus.
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
D-
B
Pauline Hanson's One Nation
-
-
-
-
C
B
Reason Aus.
B+
B+
Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party
-
D-
C+
Sustainable Aus. Party
-
B
B
United Aus. Partu
D-
F
Victorian Socialists
B+
B+

DETAILED PARTY GUIDE DOWNLOAD

Click the download icon on the right to be taken to KO-FI

This is a digital download of:
The Party Comparison Chart (Black/white & Colour Versions, in PDFs and JPEGS)
The Detailed Party Guide

Voting Cheat Sheet (As a PDF and JPEG)

VOTING ABOVE THE LINE

Reconsider voting above the line due to group voting tickets. If you vote above the line, you only pick 1 group, and that group will decide all your preferences. Reconsider voting above the line so you have more control of your vote!
Last election, a candidate won with only 0.6% of 1st preference votes due to group voting tickets. This should not be the case.

VOTING BELOW THE LINE

Vote in order of YOUR preference, and if you do the minimum, do NOT put your least favourite party as last.

Put them in order of favourite until you hit the minimum, additionally until you reach a Major Party (Labor or Liberal) or continue until you have numbered everyone from favourite to least favourite.

additional resources:

http://theyvoteforyou.org.au - check your local MPs and candidates here for their history of voting!

https://icanvote.org.au/ - Vic election candidate guide!
http://chickennation.com/voting - a really good comic on how to vote!
https://check.aec.gov.au/ - Check your enrollment

https://www.vec.vic.gov.au/voting/2022-state-election/how-to-fill-out-a-ballot-paper - Guide on filling out the ballot paper

SPREAD THE WORD!

 Please note that these guides may become inaccurate as parties bring forward new policy.

All information compiled by Gaia Mitchell 2022